Promotion of British Values and Prevention of Radicalisation Policy

This policy applies to all pupils and staff at Sheffield High School, including the Early Years Foundation Stage.

The school aims to prepare its pupils fully for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of life in British society. In doing this, the school fulfils its statutory duty to promote the spiritual, moral, cultural, mental and physical development of all its pupils, and to actively promote the fundamental British values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs.

These values are promoted through the curriculum, through assemblies, through extra-curricular activities, and through the routine behaviour expected of pupils and staff. They are embedded in the ethos of the school and its values which promote Respect, Kindness, Tolerance, Co-operation and Integrity.

The school’s curriculum is designed to:

  • enable pupils to develop their self-knowledge, self-esteem and self-confidence;
  • enable pupils to distinguish right from wrong and to respect the civil and criminal law of England;
  • encourage pupils to accept responsibility for their behaviour, show initiative and understand how they can contribute positively to the lives of those living and working in the locality in which the school is situated and to society more widely;
  • enable pupils to acquire a broad general knowledge of and respect for public institutions and services in England;
  • further tolerance and harmony between different cultural traditions by enabling pupils to acquire an appreciation of and respect for their own and other cultures;
  • encourage respect for other people;
  • encourage respect for democracy and support for participation in the democratic process, including respect for the basis on which the law is made and applied in England.

Below are examples of the ways in which the school seeks to embed these fundamental values and to prevent radicalisation

Democracy

The principle of Democracy is explored in subjects such as Religious Studies and History, in PSHEE, General Studies and in assemblies. The practice is encountered by pupils in the process of electing peers to the School Council and to other positions of responsibility within the form group, in the selection of the Head Girl Team and also in the school’s mock elections, which take place at the same time as national elections.

The rule of law

The school is governed by rules and the Code of Behaviour that pupils are made aware of through induction, assemblies, in their homework planners and in documents such as the ICT Acceptable Use Agreement. The rule of law is explored in the curriculum through the PSHEE programme, the Religious Studies syllabus and the History syllabus. All staff, parents and pupils, when they join the school and as they progress through the school, are made aware of the safeguarding policy and procedure and Code of Behaviour. Pupils are taught the value of and the reasons behind the rules, their own responsibilities and the consequences of their actions when these rules are broken.

Individual liberty

Pupils are encouraged to ask questions, make independent choices, and take intellectual risks within a high challenge/low threat environment. The school seeks to create the conditions within which pupils can make informed choices. Pupils are encouraged to know, understand and exercise their rights and personal freedoms, and are advised on how to exercise these safely, for example through e-safety and PSHEE lessons and talks from external speakers.

Pupils are encouraged to develop, reflect on and articulate their own viewpoints. They are given the freedom to make choices in subject options and in the extra-curricular programme. In their teaching, our teachers encourage pupils to take ownership of their learning and make choices based on how they learn more effectively.

Mutual respect

Respect is central to the ethos of our school, and is one of our school values modelled by pupils and staff alike. The school promotes respect for others in the classroom and in all other activities. The school seeks to develop mutual respect throughout the curriculum, through assemblies and the Code of Behaviour and school values promote this.

Pupils are strongly encouraged to explore ideas and develop opinions, always understanding that disagreement does not entail loss of respect for and understanding of other’s opinions. This encouragement is evident in form time activities, public speaking and debating events and competitions (internal and external).

Tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs

Pupils are given the opportunity to explore and understand their place in the UK’s culturally diverse society, and they are given the opportunity to experience diversity within the school community.

Assemblies allow pupils to appreciate different faiths and practices, and this is supported by the programmes of study in RS, History and PSHEE. Pupils are given the opportunity to encounter other perspectives, religions, cultures and languages in numerous ways- including trips abroad.

The role of the school in the prevention of political indoctrination

This is implicit in the values described above. There is no place in the school for the promotion of partisan political views. There are occasions when it is appropriate to present pupils with different political views, such as when a national election is taking place and a mock election is taking place in school. In these cases, we undertake to ensure a balanced presentation of those views.

The school is a safe space in which pupils can understand and discuss sensitive topics, including terrorism and the extremist ideas that are part of the terrorist ideology, and learn how to challenge these ideas.

If any pupils were to express discriminatory or extremist opinions or behaviours, these would be challenged as a matter of course.

Preventing radicalisation

The school constitutes a safe space in which pupils can understand and discuss sensitive topics, including terrorism and the extremist ideas that are part of terrorist ideology, and learn how to challenge these ideas.

In the context of recent national and international events arising from the radicalisation of individuals and their subsequent involvement in extremist or terrorist activity, Sheffield High School recognises that it has a statutory duty to be aware of and ready to respond to any signs that individuals are vulnerable to radicalisation or being influenced towards supporting terrorism and forms of extremism leading to terrorism.

Radicalisation refers to the process by which a person comes to support terrorism and forms of extremism leading to terrorism.

Extremism is defined in the Prevent strategy as vocal or active opposition to fundamental British values.

At Sheffield High School we are committed to working with others to prevent vulnerable people, including children, being drawn into terrorism or activity in support of terrorism. It does this through:

1. School culture

The school promotes the spiritual, moral and cultural development of its pupils. This includes the encouragement and exercise of free speech, and the articulation and discussion of opinions. But with rights come responsibilities. If a pupil were to express discriminatory or extremist opinions or behaviours, these would be challenged as a matter of course.

Mutual respect is central to the ethos of the school, and is modelled by pupils and staff alike. The school promotes respect for others in the classroom and in all other activities. Pupils are encouraged to explore ideas and develop opinions, always understanding that disagreement does not entail loss of respect for and understanding of others’ opinions. They are given the opportunity to explore and understand their place in the UK’s culturally diverse society, and they are given the opportunity to experience diversity within the school community.

There is no place at the school for the promotion of partisan political views. There are occasions when it is appropriate to present pupils with different political views; in these cases, we undertake to ensure a balanced presentation of those views. Teaching cannot involve the promotion of partisan political views. In discussing political issues, pupils are offered a balanced presentation of opposing views.

2. Curriculum

The school actively promotes the values of democracy, rule of law, individual liberty, and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs. Its curriculum incorporates the desired learning outcomes published by the DfE (below). Pupils gain these understandings through PSHEE programmes (where questions about extremism may arise), assemblies and schemes of work in relevant curriculum subjects.

Desired learning outcomes, as defined by the Department for Education:

  • An understanding of how citizens can influence decision-making through the democratic process;
  • An appreciation that living under the rule of law protects individual citizens and is essential for their well-being and safety;
  • An understanding that there is a separation of power between the executive and the judiciary, and that while some public bodies such as the police and the army can be held to account through Parliament, others such as the courts maintain independence;
  • An understanding that the freedom to hold other faiths and beliefs is protected in law;
  • An acceptance that people having different faiths or beliefs to oneself (or having none) should be accepted and tolerated, and should not be the cause of prejudicial or discriminatory behaviour;
  • An understanding of the importance of identifying and combatting discrimination.

3. Safeguarding framework and Action Plan to reduce the risk of radicalisation and extremism

Identifying and acting appropriately on any evidence that an individual is vulnerable to extremism or radicalisation is part of the broader safeguarding role of the school and its staff. Sheffield High School GDST’s Safeguarding Policy and Procedures sets out in detail the framework, which is supported by other policies, such as Behaviour, Anti-bullying and the ICT Acceptable Use Agreement.

With regard to preventing radicalisation, the school:

  • Prohibits extremist speakers/events at the school; and has established clear protocols for ensuring that any visiting speakers – whether invited by staff or by children themselves – are suitable and appropriately supervised
  • Manages access to extremist material – including through the Internet. GDST schools use Websense screening which filters Internet traffic coming through the school. Websites with militancy and extremist content are screened through this system. In addition, Websense can monitor requested internet access to radical sites by users of school systems

(Every effort is made to filter extremist sites, and ensure that pupils are safe from terrorist and extremist material when accessing the Internet in school. The key word here is ‘appropriate’, given that pupils need to be educated in the use of the Internet, and too high a level of filtering would impede wider educational aims. All newspapers and journals are ordered by the Librarian under supervision of the Deputy Head.)

  • Trains its staff to recognise signs of radicalisation/extremism, and to know what to do; with the result that staff have the knowledge and confidence to identify children at risk of being drawn into terrorism, and to challenge extremist ideas which can be used to legitimise terrorism and are shared by terrorist groups. Staff know where and how to refer children and young people for further help.
  • Works in partnership: risk assessments and referrals are made in liaison with other local agencies. Channel is the multi-agency process designed to safeguard vulnerable people from being drawn into extremist behaviour, and works in a similar way to existing safeguarding partnerships (see below)
  • Has established referral mechanisms to identify individuals who are vulnerable to extremism or radicalisation, and works with local partners to develop appropriate support strategies.
  • Provides pastoral support for its pupils through trained form tutors, Head of Year and the extended pastoral team which includes a school counsellor with whom the pupils can discuss any concerns.
  • Has a culture which carries through the British values of tolerance and respect through assemblies, form time activities, the PSHEE programme and the conduct of pupils and staff both within the school community and within the wider local, national and international community with which there are many links

Referring Concerns

The school follows the Channel process in recognising signs of potential radicalisation and referring concerns.

The Channel process is part of the government’s overall strategy of preventing radicalisation, and sets out a framework within which it agencies work together to:

  • identify individuals at risk of being drawn into terrorism
  • assess the nature and extent of that risk
  • develop the most appropriate support plan for the individuals concerned.

The Channel referral process requires that concerns should be passed on to the school’s Safeguarding Lead, who may consult with the local Prevent Officer (Police/Local Authority). If further action is considered appropriate, screening by the police Channel Coordinator might take place, followed by a preliminary assessment by the Local Authority’s Prevent Lead and Police Channel Coordinator. Again, if further action is considered necessary, the next step might be the creation of an assessment and action plan by the local Multi-Agency Channel Panel, and subsequent implementation of that plan, which would be aimed at re-engaging the individual and preventing radicalisation.

Channel is about safeguarding children and adults from being drawn into committing terrorist-related activity. It involves early intervention to protect vulnerable people and divert them away from the risk they face before illegality occurs. The framework for referral, review and action is not intended to criminalise individuals, but to set a course to avoid precisely that.

Safeguarding children and young people from radicalisation is no different from safeguarding them from other forms of harm. Indicators for vulnerability to radicalisation overlap with those which underlie other vulnerabilities that might give rise to safeguarding concerns, including:

• Family tensions

• Sense of isolation

• Distance from cultural heritage

• Experience of racism or discrimination either personally or as a witness to the event

• Feeling of failure.

The risk of radicalisation may be the product of a number of factors. Identifying this risk requires that we exercise professional judgement, seeking further advice as necessary.

Anyone with concerns about a pupil being vulnerable to radicalisation or extremism should contact the school’s Designated Safeguarding Lead.

Possible activities or events that would raise initial concerns:

  • A pupil disclosing her exposure to the extremist actions, views or materials of others outside of school
  • Graffiti symbols, writing or art work promoting extremist messages or images
  • Students accessing extremist material online, including through social networking sites
  • Parental reports of changes in behaviour, friendship or actions and requests for assistance
  • Other local schools, local authority services, and police reports of issues affecting their students
  • A pupils voicing opinions drawn from extremist ideologies and narratives
  • Use of extremist or ‘hate’ terms to exclude others or incite violence
  • Expressions of intolerance to difference, whether it be religious, gender, disability, sexuality, ethnicity
  • Attempts to impose extremist views or practices on others
  • Expressions of extreme anti-Western or Anti-British views.
  • Changing their style of dress or personal appearance to accord with the group.

The Channel guidance describes the possible indicators of vulnerability, around the three dimensions of engagement, intent and capability:

  1. Engagement
    1. spending increasing time in the company of other suspected extremists
    2. changing their style of dress or personal appearance to accord with the group
    3. their day-to-day behaviour becoming increasingly centred around an extremist ideology, group or cause
    4. loss of interest in other friends and activities not associated with the extremist ideology, group or cause
    5. possession of material or symbols associated with an extremist cause (e.g. the swastika for far right groups)
    6. attempts to recruit others to the group/cause/ideology
    7. communicating with others in a way that suggest identification with a group/cause/ideology.
  2. Engagement
    1. spending increasing time in the company of other suspected extremists
    2. changing their style of dress or personal appearance to accord with the group
    3. their day-to-day behaviour becoming increasingly centred around an extremist ideology, group or cause
    4. loss of interest in other friends and activities not associated with the extremist ideology, group or cause
    5. possession of material or symbols associated with an extremist cause (e.g. the swastika for far right groups)
    6. attempts to recruit others to the group/cause/ideology
    7. communicating with others in a way that suggest identification with a group/cause/ideology.
  3. Intent
    1. clearly identifying another group as threatening what they stand for and blaming that group for all social or political ills
    2. using insulting or derogatory names or labels for another group
    3. speaking about the imminence of harm from the other group and the importance of action now
    4. expressing attitudes that justify offending on behalf of the group, cause or ideology
    5. condoning or supporting violence or harm towards others
    6. plotting or conspiring with others.
  4. Capability
    1. having a history of violence
    2. being criminally versatile and using criminal networks to support extremist goals
    3. having occupational skills that can enable acts of terrorism (such as civil engineering, pharmacology or construction)
    4. having technical expertise that can be deployed (e.g. IT skills, knowledge of chemicals, military training or survival skills).

Contact details

Nina Gunson 0114 2660324 Ext: 25005 Head & Designated Safeguarding Deputy 

Sarah White 0114 358 7606 Ext 25006 Deputy Head & Designated Safeguarding Deputy

Andree Reed 0114 358 7630 Ext: 25030 Head of Pastoral Care & Designated Safeguarding Lead

Chris Hald 0114 3587638 Ext: 25038 Head of Juniors & Designated Safeguarding  Deputy

Rachael Leslie 0114 3587638 Ext:25039 Designated Safeguarding Deputy for EYFS

Cathy Walker 01143587618 Ext: 25018 Assistant head (Director of Sixth Form) Designated Safeguarding Deputy

Trust Office – 020 7393 6666 (tel) 020 7393 6789 (fax)

People Department

Legal: LegalDepartmentTrustOffice@UK.GDST.NET Tel: 020 7393 6652

HR: hrdepartment@wes.gdst.net Tel: 020 7393 6680

Innovation and Learning Department

innovationandlearning@wes.gdst.net Tel: 020 7393 6688

Multi-agency contacts

LADO Tel: 0114 2734850

Sheffield Safeguarding Children Advisory Service Tel: 0114 2053535/3554

Rotherham Safeguarding Children Advisory Service Tel: 01709 336080

Barnsley Safeguarding Children Advisory Service Tel: 01226 772400

Doncaster Safeguarding Children Advisory Service Tel: 01302 734747

Derbyshire Safeguarding Children Advisory Service Tel: 01629 532181

Nottinghamshire Safeguarding Children Advisory Service Tel: 01159 773935

Child Protection Enquiry Team Tel: 0114 273 4925

(out of office via Healthcall) Tel: 0114 242 7305

Sheffield Safeguarding Children Board Tel: 0114 2734450

Social Services Child Protection co-ordinators: Tel: 0114 273 4934

Fax: 0114 273 4628

Child Protection Advisers: Tel: 0114 226 2138/

39/40/41/42/43

Careline (confidential crisis telephone line

For children, young people and adults): Tel: 0208 514 1177

Childline: Tel: 0800 1111

Police – Hammerton Road Tel: 0114 2202020

Brendan Pakenham (SYP) Prevent Officer Tel: 07769 131 474

Email: Brendan.pakenham@southyorks.pnn.police.uk

Joanne Batty (SYP) Prevention Officer Tel: 07770 823 772

Email: joanne.batty@southyorks.pnn.police.uk

Tim Wright – Prevent & Counter Terrorism Co-ordinator for Sheffield

Department for Education

(dedicated telephone helpline) Tel: 020 73407264 (non emergency)

Or email counter extremism@education.gsi.gov.uk

Safeguarding Adult Team via Cath Erine Tel: 0114 273 6870

Email: cath.erine@gcsx.sheffield.gov.uk

Police and Partner Referral Pathways

In an emergency (where yours or others safety is threatened):

  • Call 999
  • Call 101
  • Call the Anti-Terrorist Hotline (can be anonymous) 0811 789 321
  • Call Crime Stoppers 0800 555 111
  • Contact the local authority Children/Adult safeguarding leads
  • Contact the South Yorkshire Police Prevent Officers
  • Contact your Local Policing Team

In non-emergencies:

To report illegal terrorist information, pictures of videos you’ve found on the internet: https://www.gov.uk/report-terrorism

Responsibility:Updated:Review:
AR09/1809/19